Self Promotion

May 20, 2017

One of the biggest challenges an author has to face is to advertise his or her writing.  It often goes against the grain and in my case this is certainly true.  Writing is a lonely art and means that the writer is more than likely shut away on their own with whatever tools they use (pen, paper, typewriter, PC) and don’t emerge with a final product until it is felt that the time is right to show it to someone.

Leonardo da Vinci has been quoted as saying that Art is never finished, only abandoned.  This is certainly true of my written work as it goes through draft after draft until I feel I can take it no further.  So by the time I have finished with a manuscript and my book is published I can hardly bare to look at it again let alone discuss its creation with others.

But those who especially enjoy reading fiction are likely to be fascinated by the creative process, particularly if they are engaged by a particular writer’s work and want to find out more.  So about a week ago when I was given the chance to discuss my writing in an online interview I jumped at the opportunity, because not only did it give me a chance to demonstrate the motivation behind my writing process but it also provided me with a great opening to promote my books

Keith Jahans

The full interview can be seen at:

http://www.thecrazymind.com/2017/05/peatmore-press-interview-with-funder.html

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The Blurb on the Back

October 25, 2012

The most blatant piece of advertising connected with a book is the blurb.  With the traditional hardcover and paperback formats it is on the back of the jacket with sometimes the addition of a catchy one liner on the front.  With the ebook and audiobook, where to put it is not so clear but to gain the most benefit it must be placed on the website and all flyers, posters etc. where information about the book is displayed.

The blurb should entice the reader into wanting to read the story. It should never give away the ending.  It differs markedly in this respect from a summary sent to a prospective literary agent or publisher who should always be given more including the ending.

Great tips for writing blurbs can be found at http://www.prarts.com/news_view.aspx?articleid=15&LessonID=2

A good account of the history of blurb writing can be found at http://www.themillions.com/2012/02/i-greet-you-in-the-middle-of-a-great-career-a-brief-history-of-blurbs.html

Examples of what some consider to be the best blurbs can be viewed at http://www.rtbookreviews.com/content/writing-stars-vote-best-back-cover-blurb


Opening sentences

October 15, 2012

Opening sentences are important they must grab the reader’s attention.  They litter the great works of fiction.  To see a list of some excellent examples go to http://www.openingsentences.com

Peatmore Press has done its best to make these stand out well in its published novels.  Whether they work or not will only be born out if the reader carries on reading and then comes back for more.  Only time will tell.

Corgrill’s Mill:
George Cogrill was uneasy.

Victim of Compromise:
The naked body of a young woman lay face down on the double bed like a discarded doll, a towelling cord wrapped tightly around her neck.

Gifford’s Games:
Guy sat back from the computer screen, folded his hands behind his head and sighed with satisfaction.

However, the first sentence may not be enough.  The real proof may be in the first paragraph.  It is the words at the beginning which must hold the reader’s attension.

Corgrill’s Mill:
George Cogrill was uneasy.  It was a bright sunny day in June and it was his birthday, but he had received a summons from his aunt.  No matter what the weather, or the occasion, his aunt always made him feel uneasy and a summons from her could not be ignored.

Victim of Compromise:
The naked body of a young woman lay face down on the double bed like a discarded doll, a towelling cord wrapped tightly around her neck.
“Dressing gown cord,” explained Donovan.  “The ‘otel supplies gowns for their guests.  The room’s been checked and photographed.  Mr Wallace said everything should be left as it was found till you arrived.  The doctor’s been and gone, and Forensic are waiting to move in when you’ve finished.”

Gifford’s Games

Guy sat back from the computer screen, folded his hands behind his head and sighed with satisfaction.  “Great, I’ve just withdrawn five billion from the Bank of England.”


Why Self Publish?

June 10, 2010

If you feel that self publishing is an easy way to make money then forget it.  Until you become an established writer or unless you are a celebrity then you will start out by making a loss.  This is the gamble that large publishing houses make.  They can afford it as they have a large stable of successful writers.  They also work with editors and agents who they rely on to know what the market wants and spot talent.  But the stories of them missing gifted authors are legion.

The novelist with a story to tell and faith in his or her own work will keep trying and eventually someone in the industry may take notice.  To write a narrative of 80,000 words plus and reach a satisfactory ending if only for ones self is no mean achievement.   It is only natural to want to share this with others even they number only a few.

It is not surprising that most authors survive on the proceeds of the “day job” in order to earn a crust whilst satisfying the urge to write.  The compulsion to share their writing with others is much stronger than the financial and physical effort exerted in its making.  As the saying goes “If a tree falls in a forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound?”