Self Promotion

May 20, 2017

One of the biggest challenges an author has to face is to advertise his or her writing.  It often goes against the grain and in my case this is certainly true.  Writing is a lonely art and means that the writer is more than likely shut away on their own with whatever tools they use (pen, paper, typewriter, PC) and don’t emerge with a final product until it is felt that the time is right to show it to someone.

Leonardo da Vinci has been quoted as saying that Art is never finished, only abandoned.  This is certainly true of my written work as it goes through draft after draft until I feel I can take it no further.  So by the time I have finished with a manuscript and my book is published I can hardly bare to look at it again let alone discuss its creation with others.

But those who especially enjoy reading fiction are likely to be fascinated by the creative process, particularly if they are engaged by a particular writer’s work and want to find out more.  So about a week ago when I was given the chance to discuss my writing in an online interview I jumped at the opportunity, because not only did it give me a chance to demonstrate the motivation behind my writing process but it also provided me with a great opening to promote my books

Keith Jahans

The full interview can be seen at:

http://www.thecrazymind.com/2017/05/peatmore-press-interview-with-funder.html

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Book Reviews

October 29, 2012

There are hundreds of books published each month so it is impossible for all of them to be reviewed by a reputable critic.  All authors like their book reviewed but only extracts from the favourable ones get used on the jacket.  There is no doubt that good reviews are good for publicity but it is questionable whether the reader takes much notice of them.

Peatmore Press took great trouble to find reviewers for its first published book, Cogrill’s Mill but it was considered doubtful whether buyers took any notice of these when extracts were printed on the jacket or its website as the reviewers were hardly recognised household names.

http://peatmore.com/cogrills.htm

Most reviewers at that time expected payment especially if it was required by a specific publication date.  So when successive books were published the Company went ahead and launched them without any glowing tributes to accompany them preferring to rely on word of mouth to help.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/26/business/book-reviewers-for-hire-meet-a-demand-for-online-raves.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

After all, it is not what is printed on the jacket or even the beginning of the story or the ending written specifically to grab the readers’ attention that matters; it is the bit in the middle which counts.


The Blurb on the Back

October 25, 2012

The most blatant piece of advertising connected with a book is the blurb.  With the traditional hardcover and paperback formats it is on the back of the jacket with sometimes the addition of a catchy one liner on the front.  With the ebook and audiobook, where to put it is not so clear but to gain the most benefit it must be placed on the website and all flyers, posters etc. where information about the book is displayed.

The blurb should entice the reader into wanting to read the story. It should never give away the ending.  It differs markedly in this respect from a summary sent to a prospective literary agent or publisher who should always be given more including the ending.

Great tips for writing blurbs can be found at http://www.prarts.com/news_view.aspx?articleid=15&LessonID=2

A good account of the history of blurb writing can be found at http://www.themillions.com/2012/02/i-greet-you-in-the-middle-of-a-great-career-a-brief-history-of-blurbs.html

Examples of what some consider to be the best blurbs can be viewed at http://www.rtbookreviews.com/content/writing-stars-vote-best-back-cover-blurb


Book Promotion Campaign — Part One

November 22, 2010

Marketing and promotion is not easy for writers who are use to working alone and are self conscious about their work.  Christmas is approaching and is an ideal time to beginning selling.  Books are relatively cheap compared to other small gifts and make ideal presents.  With this in mind, Peatmore Press intends to enter the marketing arena to actively promote Jack Lindsey’s novel, “Cogrill’s Mill”, and the outcome as to whether the campaign will be successful or not will be reported here.

It takes a great deal of courage for people who are shy about their work to actively shout out how wonderful it is but if their books are to be successful this is what they have to do.  Fear of ridicule and being embarrassed about setting one’s self up for public display is a powerful deterrent.  However, inspiration has been provided by Jane Wenham-Jones’s excellent manual, “Wannabe a Writer We’ve Heard Of”, which graphically shows the fears and lengths the successful writers must overcome so that their work can reach the public.

With this in mind, promotional badges and postcards have been prepared and armed with these Peatmore representatives have set out to woo prospective readers.  The first foray in this arena took place on Friday 21st November with a stall at the local leisure centre with Woking’s One World Party.  Not many books were sold but useful contacts were made.  It now remains to be seen where the promotional trail will lead.

Promotion material

Postcard

Badge