Putting emotion into Fiction

March 11, 2019

A good way to grab readers’ attention is to tap into their emotions.  One way is to include humour in a narrative, even if you do not set out to write a funny story.  I have written two humorous novels under the penname, Jack Lindsey and hope those that read them found them entertaining.

I have also written two thrillers under the pennames of Luke Johnson and Keith Jahans (my real name).  By using these names I could distinguish between my comic writing and these last two novels.  But there was a great temptation to insert a little humour into even these, which I did sparingly as I think, in the instances where I used it, it served to flesh out some of the characters and to relieve tension to give the reader a chance to draw breath.  This device is used by some truly great writers and arguably the greatest writer of all, Shakespeare, used humour in his tragedies (The grave diggers in Hamlet and the porter in Macbeth).

Making a reader cry is the hardest emotion to evoke.  I have experienced this when watching movies directed by expert storytellers.  I was moved to tears by the impending possible death of Spielberg’s character ET who was not and did not even look human and did not in the end die.  But I have rarely experienced this emotion when reading novels.  But perhaps this is just me.

A few of my readers have contacted me to say that they were upset about the death of two characters in my first novel, Cogrill’s Mill.  But I think this may be because they thought that I had wasted further comic potential of characters they had grown to identify with rather than morning their loss.  This was a surprise in what I had planned to be a comedy and not a tragedy.  But I suppose this only serves to show that a writer can forget that comedy often turns out to be tragic.

Keith Jahans


Book Excerpt – Gifford’s Games by Jack Lindsey

November 13, 2018

Guy sat back from the computer screen, folded his hands behind his head and sighed with satisfaction.  “Great, I’ve just withdrawn five billion from the Bank of England.”

“That’s cool,” murmured Howard from where he was sitting huddled over his monitor on only the other computer console in the room.  “Great hacking.”

The room was part of the Telesoft offices.  The main entrance led from the twin lift doors.  To the left of the lift was a coat stand on which hung two wrinkled anoraks, one green and one blue.  A large desk spanned the left wall.  It contained the two computer consoles and two telephones.  Guy and Howard were each sitting at one of the consoles.

“Not me this time, my son, Trickster Trader,” explained Guy.  “It’s a game I’m road testing.  You’ve got to withdrawal as much money as you can from the world’s largest banks, escape from Hong Kong, keep out of jail and catch a plane to the Bahamas without the world’s press, your wife and your mistress, in Newport Pagnell, being none the wiser.”

http://peatmore.com/giffordsgames.htm


Book Review – Waiting in the Wings and other diversions by Douglas O´Shea

July 26, 2013

This is a second collection of stories by an expert raconteur.  This time he has included a couple of clever poems.  The stories and poems are light and provide entertaining reading.  They are ideal for anyone wishing to while away the odd ten or fifteen minutes as they can be dipped in and out of at any spare moment.  Give them a try and you will not be disappointed.

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Waiting in the Wings and other Diversions by Douglas O’Shea is available in the Kindle Store

www.amazon.co.uk/kindlebooks


The Oscars – another opportunity for book promotion

February 23, 2012

Most good books have been turned into films and many of these have gone on to dominate that most prestigious of film awards, “The Oscars.”  If a film wins an Oscar, or indeed several Oscars, then it is certain to boost its sales at the box office.  This in turn can swell the sales of the book on which the film is based.

Last year the film “The King’s Speech” won the Academy Award (Oscar) for Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor , and Best Original Screenplay.  With this in mind Peatmore Press has released the audio book, “The Queen Screech,” as a free download to coincide with the presentation of the award ceremony.  Although this humorous story bears no resemblance to the award winning film, now is a good time to promote it and the ebook collection, “Crime and Passion” from which it was adapted.

The free download is available from www.peatmore.com  until 27th February.


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