Book Excerpt ‒ Cogrill’s Mill by Jack Lindsey

August 15, 2019

He stood glumly on the pavement and stared at the shop window.  It contained prominently displayed photographs of weddings as well as portraits of an assortment of people, children and domestic animals.  He agonised for ten minutes and then with great determination strode to the door, opened it and walked inside.

A bell sounded as it swung shut behind him.  The shop was deserted.  In front of him was a small counter, behind which was a stack of filing cabinets.  He approached the counter and looked around him.  More photographs, similar to those in the window, adorned the walls.  To the left of the counter a small door led to a back room and to its right, a wooden flight of stairs led upwards.  There was a clatter of feet on the stairs and a very pretty golden-haired girl descended.  She stepped behind the counter.  “Can I help you?” she asked in a polite soft voice.  Her eyes were bright blue and her smile sparkled.

George was mesmerised by her beauty but he managed to summon up some words. “I … I wish to speak to Mr Gloam,” he stammered.

“There is no Mr Gloam,” she replied.

George was confused but he blustered on. “The sign says V. Gloam.”

She nodded, still smiling.  “That’s me … Victoria Gloam.”

“I was looking for Victor Gloam,” George continued.

“Victor Gloam was my father. He died two years ago.”

George felt a surge of relief.  “Oh really,” he breathed.  Fate was on his side again.

The girl’s smile changed to a frown.  “Well there’s no need to look so pleased about it,” she said.

George’s face reddened.  “I’m extremely sorry, I didn’t mean …”

“What did you wish to see my father about, Mr … er … um?  What did you say your name was?”

“Oh, er … um … Smith,” replied George and added hastily, “I was asked to look your father up.  I’m sorry to have troubled you, good-bye!”  He turned quickly for the door.

“Good-bye, Mr Smith!”  Victoria Gloam called after him.

Once outside, George hurried across the road to a telephone box.  Life was pleasant once more. He could hardly contain himself.   He snatched open the door, grabbed the telephone receiver and quickly dialled his aunt’s number.  His call was answered by the butler. “Hello, Gumage,” said George, “is my aunt there?”

“I will see if I can find her, Master George.”

Some moments passed and then Aunt Jane’s harsh voice sounded at the end of the line.  “Hello, George,” she said.

“Hello, Aunt Jane!” George said breezily.  She would be pleased that he had acted so speedily and successfully.  “I’m calling from Tidburn!”

“Oh yes.”

“Yes.” Then George remembered to lower his voice and tried to sound not so joyful.  “I’m afraid Victor Gloam is dead.”  There was silence at the other end of the telephone.

“Did you hear me, Aunt Jane?” asked George

“I heard you, George.”

“So I can’t give him half my inheritance.”

“I realise that, George.”

“Well, I thought I ought to let you know as soon as possible.  Now I had better be going as I am phoning from a call box and I haven’t much change.  Good-bye, Aunt Jane.”

“George!”

“Yes, Aunt Jane?”

“Did he leave any family?”

George felt his heart sink. “Family, Aunt Jane?”

“Yes, George, a wife, children.”

George began to stammer. “I’m … I’m not sure.”

“What do you mean, you’re not sure?”

“I’ll … I’ll have to check.”

“Well make sure that you do, because if there are any relatives then they’re entitled to get what should have gone to Victor Gloam.  Is that clear, George?”

“Yes, Aunt Jane,” said George sadly. “Good-bye.”

“Good-bye, George.”

George slowly put the receiver down.  Well that was that.  He would have to see the girl again.  It was now clear that his quiet comfortable life would definitely change.  Well, it could not be helped.  He crossed the road and entered the shop once more.

http://peatmore.com/cogrills.htm

Photograph : 123RF konstantin32


Music in Fiction

August 29, 2018

Conveying music in fiction is hard to do.  I have read novels where an author has written an original song and printed the lyrics on the page.  A good example of this can be found in the works of Tolkien where his penned “folk” songs are sung by his heroic characters.  But when reading these stories I find it hard to visualise these songs without a tune to put them to.  This is of course where film and audio adaptations have the advantage over the written word where the producer is able to hire musicians to write a fitting melody.  I suppose the author could add a short piece of sheet music to fit the lyrics but the musically illiterate such as myself and even those among my readers might find this a distraction.

Instead, I have merely opted to describe the sound without going deeply into its substance.  In my first novel, Cogrill’s Mill, I have simply suggested that my fictional characters were listening to local folk music or when they were listening to contemporary country music I chose a well known song, namely Dolly Parton’s Jolene.  My latest novel features a young female singer who becomes a star and I applied the same technique here.  In this way I hope to show my readers that her singing and the sound of her voice are essential ingredients to the plot.

Copyright: Dmitriy Cherevko / 123RF Stock Photo
Magic Bullets can be found at http://peatmore.com/magicbullets.htm

Keith Jahans


The Mystery of the Peatmore Press Amazon Paperback Novels – Update

July 26, 2018

It is interesting to report that the staggering listing of $615.72 on amazon.com and the outrageous listing of £2,431.99 on amazon.co.uk for the Peatmore Press book, Cogrill’s Mill, have now disappeared from its book pages since I posted my blog on 23 July.  I am glad to see that someone has been paying attention to my posts.

Keith Jahans


The Mystery of the Peatmore Press Amazon Paperback Novels

July 23, 2018

Listings for the paperback versions of Peatmore Press novels have disappeared from amazon.com and amazon.co.uk with one exception; the exception being my first novel, “Cogrill’s Mill,” on amazon.com.  This novel is still listed as being available from my Company, “Peatmore Press,” as an independent trader at $10.00 plus postage and packing which is about right.  The listings of the company’s other novels have been removed from amazon.com and there are no listings for any paperback book from Peatmore Press as an independent trader on amazon.co.uk.

Peatmore Press’s status as an independent trader was removed from amazon.co.uk about a year or so ago, presumably because we did not sell enough books through the Amazon web page.  That is understandable because as a retailer Amazon has a perfect right not to sell any books it does not deem profitable.  But there is another exception which is quite staggering as one independent seller is advertising Cogrill’s Mill at a staggering $615.72 on amazon.com and an another for an outrageous £2,431.99 on amazon.co.uk. (See www.amazon.com/dp/B005NACKBY and www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B005NACKBY).  I call this staggering and outrageous as Cogrill’s Mill is available through the Peatmore Press website (www.peatmore.com) and can be ordered through any bookseller for £6.99 (for peatmore.com there is an additional charge of £2.01 for postage and packing).

This occurrence is not by any means unique.  Check out the article by Shaunacy Ferro (see https://tinyurl.com/yd7m7q8x) with regard to “One Snowy Knight” a historical romance novel by Deborah MacGillivray, which at one point a paperback version was advertised on amazon.com for $2800.  This advert has since been removed, but the article makes interesting reading.  It will also be interesting how long these highly expensive adverts on Amazon stay listed following the publication of this blog.

My kindle ebook versions of the Peamore Press novels continue to be listed on Amazon as they continue to sell or have been available under various promotion deals approved by us.  My own theory is that the listings for paperbacks have been removed as Amazon would prefer it if we republished these paperbacks using their own publishing service known as Create Space.  This is just a theory so I may be wrong about this.

But if anyone who reads this can tell me how this phenomenon has been allowed to happen.  I would be interested to hear from you.

Keith Jahans

This image was copied from the amazon.co.uk Cogrill’s Mill book page on 22 July 2018.  The Kindle edition normally retails at £4.00 but on this day the price was reduced to £0.99 as part of a short term book promotion run with Peatmore Press approval.  But look how the price differs from the paperback offer, which does not meet with Peatmore Press approval!


Book Promotion – getting the price right

October 19, 2015

For a publisher setting the price of a paperback book is not complicated. The cost of printing and distributing is easily calculated and all that remains is to add a sufficient sum to gain enough profit from which to pay the bookseller, the author’s royalty and running costs. But, the situation with ebooks is more complicated.

The first Peatmore Press book, Cogrill’s Mill, was first published as a pdf in the days when ebooks were unheard of. There was little in the way of production costs as the novel was available as a download from the Company website (www. Peatmore .com) or distributed by CD. Now so many multinational companies such as Amazon and Apple have entered the ebook market and, since the biggest seller of its ebooks is Amazon, the Cogrill’s Mill ebook is now exclusively offered for sale through the Kindle bookstore. Thus practically zero production costs are incurred by this publisher. Amazon take 65% of the book sales, the remaining 35% goes to the publisher / author.

In the days when it was available as a download the price was set at £4.00 which was half the cost of printing and distributing the paperback version and was considered to be a good rule of thumb. A search of the Amazon bookstore has shown that the ebooks on sale there vary greatly in price. Amazon seem to benefit greatly from the number of free ebooks on its Kindle store but a small publisher is only able to offer its books for free in a promotional deal for a limited time.

It is said that offering a book at too low a price can devalue it in the eyes of both the seller and buyer. Thus setting the value may affect sales. With this in mind, Peamore Press has decided to bring the charge for the Cogrill’s Mill ebook into line with best selling books of a similar length in a similar genre. It now remains to be seen if this will help its sales or whether the price will have to be altered again.

Keith Jahans
Peatmore Press

cover

Cogrill’s Mill by Jack Lindsey is available as a paperback from
http://peatmore.com/cogrills.htm
or as a Kindle ebook from
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Cogrills-Mill-Jack-Lindsey-ebook/dp/B005NACKBY


Book Promotion – Cogrill’s Mill

October 14, 2015

The 5 day free Kindle book promotion period for the Peatmore Press novel, Cogrill’s Mill, has ended. Most of the downloads occurred on the first two days. By far the majority of downloads happened at Amazon.com, followed by Amazon.co.uk and then Amazon.ca (Canada). This was despite the fact that the book was set in England, written in UK English and most of the reviews were posted on Amazon.co.uk. The data is presented below.

graph 4

 

 

 

 

 

 

KDP Promotion Data

The unit price for the Kindle book has now been reset to its original price (£4 / $6) and so it remains to be seen if the free book giveaways can be transferred into sales or and/or positive reviews.

Keith Jahans
Editor, Peatmore Press


Cogrill’s Mill ebook now FREE for a limited period

October 7, 2015

I am excited to offer the ebook of, Cogrill’s Mill, FREE on Amazon.co.uk & Amazon.com. It is normally £4.00 / $6.00 but you can get it 100% FREE today!
http://tinyurl.com/puwwfbo

Keith Jahans
CM Free Promotional graphic

 


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