Book Review – Babe Driven by Lizzie Chantree

May 14, 2019

This book is technically flawed in that the narrative constantly jumps point of view so that I had to re-read some passages twice in order to understand which character was describing the piece I was reading.  But having said that the story worked well and I really enjoyed reading it.

There was a great deal of description on what the characters were wearing, but this was never boring as it was evident that they were obsessed with appearance.  The characters themselves were well described and showed that the author had a good understanding about those she wrote and what motivated them.  The central narrative centred around Harriet (or Harry as she was mostly referred to) and her chauffeur driving company employing attractive female drivers.  Most of the story centred on her and a group of friends who were holidaying in an attractive villa next door to one rented by a famous pop group.

The interaction between the sexy males surrounding the pop group and the gorgeous Harry and her girlfriends was well described.  There were several twists in the story which kept me reading to the end.

Keith Jahans

Published by Nielsen and available
as a paperback and ebook

Advertisements

Independent Book Seller Needs Help

April 12, 2019

I received the following message via Linkedin and am posting it below as an example of the challenges faced by independent book sellers.

Keith Jahans

 

Jim Hart 1:09 AM

Keith, thank you for being part of my LinkedIn circle. You are one of an

exclusive group who value the written word, art, learning, and

community, a group of thinkers, creators, doers of deeds.  I value and

respect you and your connection.

Connye & I founded The Published Page Bookshop for and because of

people like you. For decades we have worked to build a truly unique

“old school” bookstore, where creativity, passion, ideas, and

excitement flow from the shelves and fill the air. Where new authors

are introduced to the public, and old treasures are preserved and

shared with new generations, a place of community. I think we have

succeeded. You can see far more of our shop in pictures and videos by

clicking on the link below.

But our wonderful shop is facing a crisis. Unless we can meet our

mortgage holder’s demands, we are in eminent danger of foreclosure,

and closing the doors of this wonderful bookstore.

Your contribution of $5.00 will help us keep the doors open.  And if

you can share this request with your own friends and acquaintances,

thank you.

We believe it is important to have physical bookstores, where

neighborhoods meet, where children discover the love of books and

reading, where authors and poets can meet and interact with their

readers, where literature and culture fill the air.

If you believe in these things also, we would love to have your help

keeping them alive. Connye and I have invested everything we have

toward those goals. We think they are worth fighting for, and hope you

agree.

Far more information about our shop and about Connye and me is shown

on our GoFundMe page:

https://www.gofundme.com/ThePublishedPage

If you would like to discuss this in person you can reach me by email

at jimhart@publishedpage.com

My personal cell for text or voice is 817-217-0656

Connye & I both hate to ask for help. If we didn’t believe this shop

was worthy of being saved we would not ask. If you can help, thank

you.

Blessings,

Jim Hart, Owner


Games in Fiction

April 5, 2019

I have played games throughout my life.  I think that this is the same for most people.  I have also followed many sports which is true for many people but not all.  Nowadays there is too much money invested in some sports but those sports where it is invested are very selective.

A great deal of invested money is derived from gambling but those that invest do so to make money and are not interested in sport.  Some sports have become so money orientated that winning is the be all and end all.  I used to follow rugby football but I do not now.  The players are so big and bulky that the small fast players I liked to watch in the 1960s and 1970s are no longer evident.  There seem to be more injuries these days because as they crash into each other more players are hurt.  There was a time when sport was an enjoyable social pastime but sadly this does not seem as apparent as it used to be.  But despite this the elements within it still make good story telling.

Whether the game you indulge in is sedentary (Board games, video and computer games) or physically active (football, athletics etc.) the intrinsic element of competiveness is stimulating.  I included some of these elements in my novel, Gifford’s Games, written under the penname Jack Lindsey and hope that I have produced a narrative that is enjoyable to read.

 

Keith Jahans

The ebook is available at http://amazon.com/dp/B00K2ACUOW and
the paperback via http://peatmore.com/giffordsgames.htm


Putting emotion into Fiction

March 11, 2019

A good way to grab readers’ attention is to tap into their emotions.  One way is to include humour in a narrative, even if you do not set out to write a funny story.  I have written two humorous novels under the penname, Jack Lindsey and hope those that read them found them entertaining.

I have also written two thrillers under the pennames of Luke Johnson and Keith Jahans (my real name).  By using these names I could distinguish between my comic writing and these last two novels.  But there was a great temptation to insert a little humour into even these, which I did sparingly as I think, in the instances where I used it, it served to flesh out some of the characters and to relieve tension to give the reader a chance to draw breath.  This device is used by some truly great writers and arguably the greatest writer of all, Shakespeare, used humour in his tragedies (The grave diggers in Hamlet and the porter in Macbeth).

Making a reader cry is the hardest emotion to evoke.  I have experienced this when watching movies directed by expert storytellers.  I was moved to tears by the impending possible death of Spielberg’s character ET who was not and did not even look human and did not in the end die.  But I have rarely experienced this emotion when reading novels.  But perhaps this is just me.

A few of my readers have contacted me to say that they were upset about the death of two characters in my first novel, Cogrill’s Mill.  But I think this may be because they thought that I had wasted further comic potential of characters they had grown to identify with rather than morning their loss.  This was a surprise in what I had planned to be a comedy and not a tragedy.  But I suppose this only serves to show that a writer can forget that comedy often turns out to be tragic.

Keith Jahans


Genera/categories

February 27, 2019

Deciding on which genre or category your book fits into can be a difficult decision for any author.  Of course the easiest way is to decide this before beginning writing but it is not always that easy as the book evolves during its creation.  Yet this decision is important for anyone who is serious about its marketing as it is the means by which any bookseller, librarian or online marketer places it on their shelves.

The largest online seller is Amazon and, if you use this outlet, it will place a book into one of its categories if you decide not to do this yourself when completing its online submission form and sometimes it can get this wrong.  The best way to seek this out yourself is to search for a book which is similar in subject matter, style and tone to your own and look at the category Amazon fits it into or how other booksellers and libraries place it in their catalogues.  Concentrate on those which top the best seller lists and try to identify the key words used in searches.

This method is not necessary foolproof as I have found that sometimes Amazon alters the categories even after you have listed them using its KDP direct website.  It may have even found a better slot than you first envisaged so make sure you keep this under review.  Amazon allows authors/publishers a chance to choose two categories for its KDP publications so it is better to slot your book into two different subgenres to help prospective readers find it (see example below).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This comedy thriller ebook is available at
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00K2ACUOW.
The paperback can be found via
http://peatmore.com/giffordsgames.htm

Keith Jahans


Short Story Review – A Matter of nurture by August von Orth

January 13, 2019

This is the first single short story I have reviewed as I normally critique complete short story collections.  The story is part of a collection from different authors featured in the Canadian Science Fiction magazine, “Neo-opsis”.  It is an intriguing tale set in a dystopian world.  On reading the first few lines I struggled with point-of-view but as I read on it soon became clear on whose view point the story was written.  This may have been deliberate as the assassin protagonist was clearly mixed up about who she really was.

It took me a couple of readings to determine what was happening in the narrative but this did not matter as the story was brief and it became clear that the protagonist was a victim of mind control.  It made me think and I do not mind that as I like story’s that make me think.  I understand that it is only available in the pages of the magazine so check it out as I am sure sci-fi fans will not be disappointed.

Keith Jahans
Editor, Peatmore Press

Published in Canada


Book Excerpt – Magic Bullets Prologue

January 3, 2019

The bullet crashed through the plate glass window and into the customer’s forehead.  It smashed through his skull and embedded itself in the wall behind him.  People screamed as the plump middle-aged man was flung off his chair away from the table where he had been dining and the shooter stepped through the shattered opening into the restaurant.
    He had not wanted to waste bullets by spraying rounds indiscriminately so he had set the Kalashnikov rifle he was holding to fire single shots.  These were to be surgical killings and he wanted to shoot dead all who crossed his path.  His feet crunched on the broken glass as he trod carefully forward and shot a woman, sheltering beneath the table in the back of the neck.  A man who looked like a waiter made a dash for two double doors and he shot him in the back before he could reach them.  Some people ran, but those who were not quick enough or those who cowered on the floor he shot one by one.  Dark blood flowed with food, drink and broken crockery among the unturned chairs.

http://peatmore.com/magicbullets.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


%d bloggers like this: